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Tech Companies Have a Brand Image Problem: Here’s How to Solve It

Stemming the tide of rampant deficits in privacy, diversity and leadership in Silicon Valley will not be easy, but change is possible.

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BY Larry Alton - 03 Feb 2019

tech companies brand image problem

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images

Tech companies everywhere, but especially those in Silicon Valley, have a serious brand image problem. Over the past few years, major tech companies have drawn ire from the public for their lack of diversity, apathy toward privacy issues, as well as their accumulation of wealth.

This isn't exactly stopping people from using the tech products we've come to rely on so heavily, but it is having an effect on share prices--and it's attracting stricter regulations from governments all over the world. If these corporate juggernauts are going to earn back the trust of consumers, shareholders, and policymakers, they need to take serious strides to change how they're publicly perceived. There are several ways to accomplish this, but it's going to take a concentrated effort.

Diversity and Representation

First, Silicon Valley has a major diversity problem--and has had one for many years. The overwhelming majority of tech CEOs (and even tech employees) are white men. This is problematic both for the vision and products of the companies and for the reputation of those companies in the general public. Having a leadership team without representation from women and minority groups means your company is less likely to consider the wants, needs, and perspectives of those groups; it's why we end up with algorithms that discriminate against women and minorities.

There is a fix, though it's not necessarily a simple one. The most obvious solution is to hire more people from underrepresented groups, but tech companies don't always have the luxury of having equal or proportional quantities of applicants from each of those groups; in other words, you can't hire more women if there aren't many qualified women applying.

So instead of simply adjusting HR practices to hire more applicants who belong to underrepresented demographics, companies need to take part in programs designed to incentivize people from minority groups to pursue careers in tech. As an example, Women in Technology (WiT) programs are becoming more popular, offering mentorship and guidance for young women looking for careers in fields like software engineering, mechanical engineering, or signal processing. Given a few years of development, enough early-stage outreach programs like these could fill the pipelines with more appliances from diverse groups, and slowly change the overall composition of these companies.

Consumer Privacy and Corporate Transparency

Tech companies have also taken a hit on the consumer privacy front, with Facebook showing up in the headlines many times in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, when it was a London-based political consulting firm was capable of harvesting the personal data of millions of Facebook users for political manipulation purposes. Apple, Amazon, Google, and other companies have also been called to testify in front of a Senate Committee on consumer privacy protections.

We use devices, software, and digital products capable of collecting and storing ridiculous quantities of data on our lives, from where we are at any given time to what we're talking about in our homes. With opaque and hard-to-understand terms of service agreements and an increasing diversity of connected devices, consumers and policymakers are more concerned than ever that data could be used for nefarious purposes--and tech brands are getting labeled as malicious, data-hungry consumer manipulators, working in darkness to take advantage of us.

There's no quick fix to this dilemma, but offering more transparency is a good start. Giving users more options when it comes to their privacy, giving them simpler tools so they can truly understand what's at stake when they use a product or service, and taking accountability when breaches do occur are the only path to restore trust.

Leadership and a Company "Face"

Tech brands also suffer from being faceless, corporate conglomerates. They're either so massive they don't have a public face, or their public face seems too detached from reality to seem relatable. Take, for example, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg; this man serves as the "face" of Facebook, but has become generally disliked and distrusted due to his reclusiveness and seemingly robotic disposition when testifying before Congress. Or take Jeff Bezos, who is periodically caricatured as a cartoonish supervillain due to his similarly reclusive nature, his ambition for growth, and his access to practically unlimited resources.

Having a stronger, more trustworthy public face isn't going to fix everything, but it would give the public someone more relatable to associate with the brand. And it doesn't have to be a charismatic, charming CEO either--it can be a handful of PR reps or even customer representatives who make consumers feel like there are "real" people behind these companies, instead of just automated tech and reclusive billionaires. It would be a massive investment, to be sure, but it's one of the only reliable ways to rebuild public trust.

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