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THE INC. LIFE

Jeff Bezos Has Lost About $22 Billion This Month, More Than Elon Musk’s Entire Net Worth. Here’s What That Really Looks Like

Also, an interview with the woman who owns all of In-N-Out Burger, what it’s like to fly the longest flight in the world, and why there might be fewer Mormon women on social media for a while.

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BY Bill Murphy Jr. - 12 Oct 2018

Jeff Bezos Has Lost About $22 Billion This Month, More Than Elon Musk's Entire Net Worth. Here's What That Really Looks Like

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images

Amazon's stock price has fallen more than 14 percent over the last 11 days, including 2 percent Thursday and 4 percent Wednesday. (All the big tech stocks have had a tough week, but Amazon has had a rough ride.)

Pegging Jeff Bezos's stake at about 16 percent of Amazon, which is the latest figure I can find--if that's still right, It would mean he has lost about $22 billion since Oct. 1.

I've written before about when he's made massive gains, for example picking up $6.2 billion in five minutes, so it only seems fair to point this out. But what does $22 billion really look like?

For one thing it's bit more than Elon Musk's entire net worth, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.

Let's try to put it in further perspective. Richard Kirshenbaum, author of Isn't That Rich? Life Among the 1%, says true billionaires think the cutoff between "rich" and "not rich" is $100 million. ("They call it a 'hundy,'" he told Town & Country last year.

If that's the case, then imagine this dollar sign "$" represents $100 million. Here's how many "hundies" Bezos has lost this month:

$$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$

$$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$

$$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$

$$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$

$$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$

$$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$

$$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$

$$$$$ $$$$$

No crying for Bezos, of course. He's still the founder of probably the most amazing company of our time, and he's still the richest person alive, by far--worth $142 billion (or if you prefer: 1,420 "hundies").

The big difference between In-N-Out and McDonald's

In-N-Out Burger is different from other chains in many ways. One big one is that it's owned 100 percent by its company, Lindsay Snyder, 36, who inherited it from relatives and became the world's youngest female billionaire. She's also famously reclusive, but sat down recently for a long interview with Forbes. (Chris Matyszczyk, Inc.com)

Why you might see fewer Mormon women on social media for a while

The Mormon church is asking half its members (only the women) to take a 10 day social media fast. This is raising eyebrows within the church because of its timing (just before the midterm elections). But also because the LDS church values both hard work and stay at home moms, so there are a lot of women running Internet-based businesses that rely on social media. (Ruth Graham, Slate)

The longest flight in world is about to land. Its destination: Newark

Singapore Airlines Flight 22 took off from Singapore last night, en route to its scenic destination, Newark Liberty International Airport, just outside New York City. It's notable because at over 17 hours, it's the inaugural trip of the world's longest ever commercial passenger flight, scheduled for three times a week service. (Bill Murphy Jr., Inc.com)

Amazon's latest patent would let Alexa figure out when you're sick

Speaking of Amazon, someone could do an entire website devoted to the company's patents. (Hmmmm.) Latest totally not creepy thing: a patent for technology to let Alexa analyze your voice, determine whether you're likely getting sick or depressed, and send you products tailored to your condition. (Jon Brodkin, ArsTechnica)

It's almost as if Facebook is taking the election seriously this time

Facebook purged more than 800 accounts, it said Thursday, focusing on fringe political pages it says violated its terms of service ahead of the midterm elections. These were hyper partisan, spammy pages, but it's going to be a controversial move, regardless. (Elizabeth Dwoskin and Tony Romm, The Washington Post)

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